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Deception

There are only two kinds of people you should lie to, your enemies or those whom you hope will become your enemies.

Plausible Deniability

Some mistakenly believe that a plausible lie is as good as the truth.

Wikipedia - Plausible deniability

If an agency (either an individual or organisation) intends to deny involvement with some thing or some event that it does in reality have a involvement with, then that denial must be plausible. An agency well practices in such deceptions will consider before being involved with anything whether it is plausibly deniable.
To ensure plausible deniability an agency will endeavour to;
  1. facilitate the event through another agency,
  2. ensure that the event has the signature of another agency although it was in fact performed by the agency.
  3. TODO complete further options.
It is likely that an agency will not become involved with that which it should not be involved if it is impossible for it to ensure the involvement is plausibly deniable.

Therefore what is plausibly deniable may realistically set the boundaries for an agency in its involvement in criminal acts.

Need to Know

When an organisation performs a process on a "need to know basis" then no individual of the organisation will be provided with more information or resources than are necessary for the execution of their part of the process.

Because processes may be analysed into sub-processes one can observe that;
  1. the individuals performing the process do not need to know about the sub-processes that are part of it, and
  2. conversely the individuals performing a sub-process do not need to know about the process it is part of.
The 1st of these is known as "abstraction". It is generally the case when one assembles something from components provided by others, that one does not need to know how the components work, only how to use them.

The 2nd of these has no special name but could be expressed by saying that, it is generally the case when one assembles something, that one does not need to know how that something will later be used by others.

Naive Organisations

Because of this it can be quite possible for an organisation to contain no individual that understands what the organisation is doing! i.e. messing up the planet. The organisation is a naive organisation.

The individuals may claim to be relieved of moral responsibility for the organisational process in so far as they did not deliberately avoid becoming informed.

Semi-Naive Organisations

The individuals in the organisation trust or have faith, that the organisation's process to which they are pledged, would meet with their approval should they know it.

The individuals may claim to be relieved of moral responsibility for the organisational process in so far as they did not deliberately avoid becoming informed and moral responsibility is passed up.

Organisational Deception

In (up-blind) organisations those at the top have unfettered control of those below them and are morally responsible for the organisations actions.

They can enact deceptions on other people and organisations by the use of stooges, i.e. people in their own organisation who are not only blind to the higher processes of the organisation but also have a false impression of it.

In the film "The spy who came in from the cold" the secret that the captured spy believes is false and after a great effort the enemy manage to extract it, and so they believe it because he believes it. this is how large organisations can deceive each other. However deception maintains animosity between groups and so will always divide and maintain social divisions. If unity is strength then this is not.


© Tom de Havas 2011. The information under this section is my own work it may be reproduced without modification but must include this notice.








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